Are Photography Contests Worthwhile or Worthless?

Are Photography Contests Worthwhile or Worthless?PhotoShelter Blog.

Are photography contests worthless? Like most arguments, there are two sides:

Yes, photography contests, on the whole, are generally worthless – they are a time and money suck, and the organizers are looking to make money or disguise them as a rights grab.

No, they provide value, in that it forces photographers to curate their best work and ultimately push themselves to compete with “the best”. Plus, reading that so-and-so won this-and-that photo contest is kind of like being named Best Smile in the yearbook – many of us tend to pay attention to those awards, even if we’re not sure why.

But before the opining begins, keep in mind that every contest is geared toward a different level of photographer (student vs. amateur vs. pro), genre of photography (documentary, commercial, fine art, etc.), and different buyers are checking out different contests (magazine editors vs. ad agencies, for example).

Below we rate several major photo contests, with a brief overview of each contests’ entry fees, prizes, promised exposure, and feedback from past winners. Our verdict is given on an A-F scale, with “A” being worthwhile and “F” being worthless. Let the grading begin:


How do I take a beautiful photo of space?

It’s a beautiful clear night – the stars are dazzling the sky, the Moon hangs proudly above and Jupiter can even be glimpsed, millions of miles away in space. A majestic roof, fretted with golden fire; it’s the type of scene you’d want to remember forever. Capturing the wonder of the night sky on camera is easier than you think. Some of the most stunning astronomy photos have been taken by amateurs. So how do you go about taking a beautiful photo of space?

BBC iWonder – How do I take a beautiful photo of space?.

 


Marc Yankus » The Space Between

somewhere_in_the_west_30s-Marc-Yankus

goldman_sachs-Marc-Yankus

new_york_berlin__three

stairs_building-Marc-Yankus

Marc Yankus » The Space Between.

Marc Yankus is a photographer and graphic artist balancing prolific commercial and fine art careers simultaneously. In his latest body of work, “The Space Between,” he presents New York’s architecture in an imaginary, yet hyper-real way.

Marc sees things differently; we talked about him having almost synesthesic moments as he walks around New York. His photographs are a result of his vision and precise post-production, and invoke a nostalgia that on the whole, New York has no time for (though I believe the new mayor is being lobbied to create a listed buildings register for those over 75 years old.) He adds more depth by layering images over antique textured paper.

“I’m drawn to the majestic details and materials of classical historical buildings, many of which are hidden from view, tucked behind new architecture. In these instances, a mere sliver of old, of history, is there to be photographed, leaving me to recreate the rest of the building to make it whole again.”


Bob Avakian

http://bobavakianphotography.com/galleries.html 

I photograph the landscape at night and at dawn. The camera captures the frames as stills, freezing time, regardless of the length of the exposure, and creating an image different from what the eye perceives. I like to believe that these resulting images are from a moment suspended between night and day. The camera is a mirror that allows me to see my surroundings with new eyes while at the same time becoming more aware of myself. Out at night, alone, the day’s cares recede and the sense of time fades. Allowing a heightened awareness to take over, I direct my attention to conveying the quiet and solitude of the night. It is this shift in attention, I believe, that allows me to experience the moment with a different vision. My exposure and printing decisions enable me to take the surroundings I know so well and present them as they have not been seen before. What fascinates me about this process is that magical element of surprise. I venture out in search of scenes that contain an unknown light source of have some other mysterious quality. Of course there are times when I don’t find anything. Since the night sets the stage, I never know where I will wind up. It reminds me so much of life. Bob Avakian


Future Shock: Google Glass and Photography

 

Future Shock: Google Glass and Photography.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 547 other followers

%d bloggers like this: