SUSAN DERGES – Paris Photo Agenda

SUSAN DERGES – Paris Photo Agenda.

Susan Derges lives and works on the west coast of England near Dartmoor in Devon. She is one of the pioneers of the largely British movement (along with Adam Fuss, Christopher Bucklow, and Garry Fabian Miler) who in the 1980s and 1990s revived the art of the photogram taking it to new and unexpected places with a freshness of scale, color, and concept. This will be the Danziger Gallery’s third show of Susan Derges’ photographs. Recently, Derges began working in the studio combining analog and digital techniques to create new forms, colors, and perspectives hitherto impossible to capture. Her practice reflects the work of the earliest practitioners of photography but is contemporary in its experimentation and awareness of new technical, conceptual, and environmental issues. Derges’ newest works, which will be receiving their first American showing, largely use the symbols of gates and arches to explore themes of reflection, memory, and the flow of time.

More information at danzigergallery.com

Susan Derges lives and works on the west coast of England near Dartmoor in Devon. She is one of the pioneers of the largely British movement (along with Adam Fuss, Christopher Bucklow, and Garry Fabian Miler) who in the 1980s and 1990s revived the art of the photogram taking it to new and unexpected places with a freshness of scale, color, and concept. This will be the Danziger Gallery’s third show of Susan Derges’ photographs.

Recently, Derges began working in the studio combining analog and digital techniques to create new forms, colors, and perspectives hitherto impossible to capture. Her practice reflects the work of the earliest practitioners of photography but is contemporary in its experimentation and awareness of new technical, conceptual, and environmental issues. Derges’ newest works, which will be receiving their first American showing, largely use the symbols of gates and arches to explore themes of reflection, memory, and the flow of time.
Read more at http://www.parisphoto.com/agenda/susan-derges#DP4qbD7OGxSMTrMX.99

Susan Derges lives and works on the west coast of England near Dartmoor in Devon. She is one of the pioneers of the largely British movement (along with Adam Fuss, Christopher Bucklow, and Garry Fabian Miler) who in the 1980s and 1990s revived the art of the photogram taking it to new and unexpected places with a freshness of scale, color, and concept. This will be the Danziger Gallery’s third show of Susan Derges’ photographs.

Recently, Derges began working in the studio combining analog and digital techniques to create new forms, colors, and perspectives hitherto impossible to capture. Her practice reflects the work of the earliest practitioners of photography but is contemporary in its experimentation and awareness of new technical, conceptual, and environmental issues. Derges’ newest works, which will be receiving their first American showing, largely use the symbols of gates and arches to explore themes of reflection, memory, and the flow of time.
Read more at http://www.parisphoto.com/agenda/susan-derges#DP4qbD7OGxSMTrMX.99

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Abelardo Morell ~ Camera Obscura

Abelardo Morell

As vivid as a dream, a hyper-sharp image of the Brooklyn Bridge and lower Manhattan materializes above tousled sheets. To make the surreal picture, Morell essentially put his camera inside a room serving as a camera and kept his shutter open for five hours to expose on film the incoming image. He used a prism to flip the projection right-side up.

“View of the Brooklyn Bridge in Bedroom,” 2009
www.abelardomorell.net

Print Portfolio | Jay Maisel Photography

 

Print Portfolio | Jay Maisel Photography.

After studying painting and graphic design at Cooper Union and Yale, Jay Maisel began his career in photography in 1954. While his portfolio includes the likes of Marilyn Monroe and Miles Davis, he is perhaps best known for capturing the light, color, and gesture found in every day life. This unique vision kept him busy for over 40 years shooting annual reports, magazine covers, jazz albums, advertising and more for an array of clients worldwide. Some of his commercial accomplishments include five Sports Illustrated swimsuit covers, the first two covers of New York Magazine, the cover of Miles Davis’ Kind of Blue (the best-selling jazz album of all time), twelve years of advertising with United Technologies, and a litany of awards from such organizations as ICP, ASMP, ADC, PPA, and Cooper Union.

Since he stopped taking on commercial work in the late ’90s, Jay has continued to focus on his personal work. He has developed a reputation as a giving and inspiring teacher as a result of extensive lecturing and photography workshops throughout the country. He also continues to sell prints, which can be found in private, corporate, and museum collections.

Jerry Uelsmann and Maggie Taylor

 

Jerry Uelsmann and Maggie Taylor Film Trailer | lynda.com

He experiments in a darkroom. She composes on a computer screen. Together, husband-and-wife artists Jerry Uelsmann and Maggie Taylor create haunting, layered dreamscapes that push the boundaries of photography’s possibilities. This documentary from lynda.com explores both the technical and emotional aspects of Jerry’s and Maggie’s work, from the composition to the criticism, with insight from other preeminent voices in photography. Step inside the artists’ quiet Florida compound for a peek at their complementary work, contrasting processes, and inspiration-seeking expeditions through an alligator-dwelling swamp. In the darkroom and on the desktop, two artists are inspired to push the boundaries of photography.

Arnold Newman

Arnold Newman (1918-2006)


He is acknowledged as one of the great masters of the 20th and 21st century and his work has changed portraiture. He is recognized as the “Father of Environmental Portraiture.” His work is collected and exhibited in the major museums around the world including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; The Chicago Art Institute; The Los Angeles Museum of Art; The Philadelphia Museum; The Tate and the National Portrait gallery, London; The Israel Museum, Jerusalem; and many other prominent museums in Europe, Japan, South America, Australia, etc.

 

Newman was an important contributor to publications such as New York, Vanity Fair, LIFE, Look, Holiday, Harper’s Bazaar, Esquire, Town and Country, Scientific American, New York Times Magazine, and many others. There are numerous books published of Newman’s work in addition to countless histories of photography, catalogues, articles and television programs. He received many major awards by the leading professional organizations in the U.S. and abroad including the American Society of Media Photographers, The International Center of Photography, The Lucie Award, The Royal Photographic Society Centenary Award as well as France’s “Commander of the Order of Arts and Letters.” In 2005, Photo District News named Newman as one of the 25 most influential living photographers. In 2006, Newman was awarded The Gold Medal for Photography by The National Arts Club. He is the recipient of nine honorary doctorates and has lectured and conducted workshops throughout the country and the world. Arnold Newman died on June 6, 2006 in New York City. He was 88 years old.