The Voyages Issue: Six Photographers on Their Dream Journeys

via The Voyages Issue: Six Photographers on Their Dream Journeys – The New York Times.

VENEZUELA

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Munem Wasif | LensCulture

Munem Wasif | LensCulture.

About Munem Wasif

Having grown up in the small town of Comilla, Munem Wasif’s dream kept changing from becoming a pilot to a cricket player and then a photographer. But none of these choices made his father happy. Later in life he moved to the comparably big city Dhaka. He obtained his diploma in photography from Pathshala, a life changing experience, which made him aware of his stories, gave him a photographic voice to photograph stories such as: the dying industry and afflicted workers of jute and tea, excluded people and disrupted lands due to environmental change and salt water, and the city so close to his heart: Old Dhaka.

Wasif prefers to photograph the people he knows. Therefore his country Bangladesh is his first, and favourite field of investigation. He never finds it a problem to be treated as a storyteller of a humanistic tradition, classical in his photographic approach, as long as it shows compassion and the emotional he experiences when photographing his subjects. With an outlook of a traditional style, he goes against the clichés, going from one direction he allows himself to grow in different directions, like the branches on a tree going their separate ways, yet with the same root of humanistic approach.

Since 2008, he has been represented by Agence Vu in Paris. He was one of the curators of Chobimela VII, International Festival of Photography. Currently he is teaching documentary photography in Pathshala, South Asian Media Institute.

Cheryle St. Onge: Natural Findings | LENSCRATCH

Cheryle St. Onge: Natural Findings | LENSCRATCH.

Natural Findings

The photographs from Natural Findings began with the idea, that our early foray into the natural world is not only innate, it is familial. When an older sibling offers up a jar of glowing fireflies, or grandmother puts a Winter Berry on your tongue, they are in a colloquial, familiar manner forging a path and beckoning to share the natural world. Natural Findings explore the curiosity and awe of our early grasp of nature; a paper wasp nest that appears dropped from Mars, the frog egg masse that on close inspect, possible through a photograph, becomes a gelatinous constellation of soon to be tadpoles. The photographs become both the shared means of a longer examination and the conduit of our own private recollection of nature.

Cig Harvey

Interview with Cig Harvey: YOU Look At ME Like An EMERGENCY

From one of the best photography blogs out there.

Sometimes you come across work you fall in love with, work that resonates with you in such a deep way, and you begin seeing the world through the lens and point of view of a great image maker.  I have been a fan of Cig Harvey’s photographs from the moment I encountered her way of seeing.  Cig is a visual painter, creating images that shimmer with color and gesture, that have the punctuation and staccato of red berries, purple finger nails, or a field of fireflies at night.  She speaks to memory, to moments, to quiet and beauty, and never loses her connection to the natural world.  Her work is a sensory experience, where you feel what she feels when she captured the dapple of summer sunlight on skin or the splash of water that is a color only our memories seem to hold.

I am thrilled to share that Cig has a new monograph, You Look At Me Like An Emergency.  The book is a spectacular autobiographical culmination of her relationships, experiences, and moments in her life.  Published by Schilt, You Look At Me Like An Emergency conveys the universal quest for personal identity and place in the world.

Cig recently moved to Maine where she lives with husband and baby.  She works as an editorial and fine art photographer and her work has been exhibited widely and is in the permanent collections of many major museums.  She was a recent finalist for the prestigious BMW Prize at Paris Photo and recently had her first solo museum show at The Stenersen Museum in Oslo, Norway.

Richard Mosse – Candy-Colored Congo

Candy-Colored Congo Richard Mosse’s three years of photography work in the Congo using discontinued infrared film is haunting, surreal and beautiful, and it’s currently on display at this year’s Venice Biennial and in a book due out this fall under the work’s title, The Enclave. Mosse is increasingly known for bringing the Cold War-era satellite film, […]

Tom Wood’s men and women

BBC News – Tom Wood’s men and women.

… To many in the business Wood is a true photographer and held in high regard. One that has dedicated his life to his art and has cut no corners nor bent to prevailing trends. He is often classified as a documentary photographer, but he tells me quite forcefully that is not the case. “I am not trying to document anything, I am asking a question. It is more about deciphering and transforming. You don’t call a poet, a documentary poet, because they write about life, so why a photographer?”

It is that exploration of the subject and what stimulated him to make a picture that is of such interest, a contest between the form and the content. “When the stuff is too journalistic and documentary then it is journalism, if it is too conceptual and arty then that is another thing, but where the two meet – that is interesting.” …

“You are after this intangible thing which is not a document. You can photograph the same face 50 times and 49 are not interesting, but one is and it goes to another place.

“I wanted to allow that time as a gestation period, each picture should be a discovery. It is about asking a question, you don’t know which are the great pictures just like that.”