Category Archives: Street Photography

Chris Kovacs Multiple Exposure B&W Photography

http://www.chriskovacsphotography.com/

(1976) Born in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Chris Kovacs is an award winning photographer best known for his multiple exposure black-and-white photography. Chris is fascinated with science, particularly with quantum mechanics and the possibility of a multiverse, or multiple, parallel universes, which also sets the stage for his style of photographic works. Chris is also interested in exploring dreams, the subconscious mind and memory. Chris’ photography focuses primarily on scenes containing elements of architecture and people. Chris captures “in camera” multiple-exposures of the same scene from different angles and later combines several multiple-exposure photographs together to form a single image. When asked about his photographic style Chris responds “It’s Multiplexualization.” Multiplexualization is a term Chris has coined. It is the digital layering of many different multiple-exposure photographs to form a single image which deliberately depicts a dreamlike quality. Multiplex, in this case, means: many elements in a complex relationship, where ualization represents the single, final image–the deliberate dreamlike visual. All of the images featured on this website were taken with an iPhone 5s. Chris resides in Vancouver, BC, Canada with his wife and two sons.


 


Yusuke Sakai | LensCulture

Yusuke Sakai | LensCulture

Yusuke Sakai | LensCulture

Yusuke Sakai | LensCulture

Yusuke Sakai | LensCulture.


Pentti Sammallahti – Here Far Away | LensCulture

Pentti Sammallahti – Here Far Away | LensCulture.

Here Far Away

Pentti Sammallahti for the first time, we are able to appreciate the breadth and scope of this Finnish photographer’s masterful work  — in a book that spans more than 40 years of exquisite black-and-white photographs. 

 


Time Captured in Layered Landscape Collages by Fong Qi Wei

http://fqwimages.com/time-dimension/

Photography is a medium that is famous for freezing time. The word snapshot suggests that a tiny slice of time is recorded for posterity. But we do know that time is also a dimension, like length, breadth and width. In fact, physicists have a model called space-time: suggesting that time is part of a continuum with the 3 dimensions that we are familiar with. A photographic print is flat, and essentially is made of 2 dimensions: length and width. Yet through composition and lens focus we give a print depth, which is a dimension that is perceived but not physically part of the photographic print. Great photographs (and great paintings) give information in all three dimensions. The best images are the ones which let you feel like you can step directly into the frame into a world which is on the other side. But the print is still an instance. Most paintings and photographs are an instance of time. That’s not the way the world works. We experience a sequence of time, and that’s why a video is somehow more compelling than a freeze frame. I work in the confines of a photographic print, because I like to do so. But in a way, I wanted to break out of this restriction of a single slice of time in photography. Photographic prints are great because they don’t need power to be displayed. They are more or less permanent. Videos are great because they record a sequence of time which shows reality almost like how we experience. Is it possible to combine the two? And not via long exposure photography where often details are lost from motion. So I played around with the tools of digital photography and post processing to give you this series: Time is a dimension.

This series of images are mostly landscapes, seascapes and cityscapes, and they are a single composite made from sequences that span 2-4 hours, mostly of sunrises and sunsets. The basic structure of a landscape is present in every piece. But each panel or concentric layer shows a different slice of time, which is related to the adjacent panel/layer. The transition from daytime to night is gradual and noticeable in every piece, but would not be something you expect to see in a still image. Similarly, our experience of a scene is more than a snapshot. We often remember a sequence of events rather than a still frame full of details. In this series, I strive to capture both details and also a sequence of time in a single 2 dimensional canvas. I hope it gives you pause and reconsider what you experience versus what you shoot with your next camera phone.


JR | JR – Artist

JR | JR – Artist

JR owns the biggest art gallery in the world.

He exhibits freely in the streets of the world, catching the attention of people who are not typical museum visitors. His work mixes Art and Act, talks about commitment, freedom, identity and limit.

After he found a camera in the Paris subway, he did a tour of European Street Art, tracking the people who communicate messages via the walls. Then, he started to work on the vertical limits, watching the people and the passage of life from the forbidden undergrounds and roofs of Paris.

In 2006, he achieved Portrait of a Generation, portraits of the suburban “thugs” that he posted, in huge formats, in the bourgeois districts of Paris. This illegal project became “official” when the Paris City Hall wrapped its building with JR’s photos.

Check-out all his other incredible projects here

JR | JR - Artist

JR | JR - Artist

JR | JR - Artist


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