Category Archives: Nature Photography

Michael Ash Partners Photographers

Michael Ash Partners Photographers


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Helen Dixon

Helen Dixon LANDSCAPE Photography

Helen started her interest with photography in 2003. It quickly became apparent that it wasn’t going to be just a passing phase – her passion continuing on with a craving for knowledge and the urge to learn all aspects of photography. She set about teaching herself the technique and art of photography. Learning from magazines, books and the Internet, she is completely self-taught.

With her love for the natural world and the diversity of the British Isles which had already featured hugely as her inspiration – it became a natural step for Helen to focus her lens on the landscape and its surroundings.


David Chow Fine Art Photography

David Chow Fine Art Photography

David Chow is a fine art photographer based in Cambridge; he studied photography at degree level and printmaking at master’s level at the Cambridge School of Art.David started his career by producing striking black and white portraits of flowers, he has since turned his eye to alternative printing techniques used by the old masters of photography and is now well known in the U.K for his exquisite Cyanotype prints of flowers. He is passionate about using such techniques as they have an ability to capture an expansive tonal range and the prints have unique luminescence. He is one of a very few practitioners in the country to be teaching alternative printing processes including cyanotype and platinum/palladium printing.

The power of David’s photography lies in its simplicity and he has been able to capture beauty in both living and dying flowers. A keen botanist, the majority of David’s flower portraits come from specimens grown and picked from his own garden. Using large and medium format cameras with the aid of natural daylight his photographs capture the most intimate and subtle details of each flower.

Over the last four years David has published three limited edition hand made books and portfolios that form part of the’ Expressive Flower Series’, beautifully hand bound, these books merge David’s love of poetry, flowers and photography in one art form. David is represented by a number of galleries in the U.K and U.S and has exhibited his work widely and is included in numerous private and corporate collections.

David has been learning alternative photographic for the past 10 years. He teaches workshops in cyanotype and platinum printing with digital negatives and was the first person to do so in the U.K. For further information click here


Dawn Heumann Photography

Dawn Heumann Photography I grew up barefoot and free spirited among the Northern California redwoods, vibrant Balinese back streets, and lush Hawaiian junglescapes. Over the span of my childhood, my parents made travel films for a living. Joining them on many of their journeys was a young, bright-eyed blond with a rapidly growing conceptual understandings of the world – me. I watched then, as I do now, the way my father would chase the sun’s golden rays. I remember clearly the early, early mornings when we had to rise as children to go hunt for that first morning light. The way he looked at the world then, has taught me to see it now, through a photographic lens.My curiosity about the world, fashioned from the many years of travel I experienced as a child, drove me to gain my undergraduate degree in Philosophy and Religion.

My pursuit of these fields was born from a determination to grasp the hugeness of the world and the oneness of the cultures I had observed, within it, as a child. After I graduated, with my BA in 2007, I bought my first SLR camera, and traveled for two years with it as my companion. The photos I produced during those years, and the happiness that came from being behind the camera, gave me the drive to return to San Francisco in the spring of 2009 to pursue a Masters Degree in Photography at the Academy of Art University in San Francisco.My experience of the world, in a way unique only to someone born into such fortune of exploration, compassion and wonder, has driven my quest to give back to this ever beautiful and ever suffering world in which I live. My parents, two people who have succeeded in creating a world for themselves that never dims, even for an instant, encouraged me to do the same. I was told, from my very first days, that I not only could do anything and be anyone I wanted to be, but that, in fact, it was my duty to do so.

The photographs I take and the images I make strive to play their small part in changing this world for the better.As a portrait photographer, a documentary photographer or a fine art photographer, I seek to capture the beauty in each moment, in each expression and each forgotten place.


Michael Kenna

Michael Kenna

Tim Baskerville
Your work, more than any photographer I can think of, seems to bridge the gap between night photography and “daylight” (for want of a better term) photography. You move freely between situations, time and light constraints, yet you still seem to incorporate the nocturne and its sense of mystery into much of your work. Because of this, you’ve not been pigeonholed as a Night Photographer, your audience has grown and I believe you have advanced night photography, it’s aesthetic qualities and concerns by a wide margin. Are you still a night photographer at heart?

Michael Kenna
[Laughs] Night and day are one and the same, they are parts of the whole. I can happily photograph during the day or night or dawn or dusk. I like to photograph at any time and there are qualities about every time of the day and night which should be appreciated, so I try to move in and out at will. There was a period when I was starting out, when I could have been called a Dawn photographer. Then I became a Day photographer, next I became a Night photographer, and now I suppose I am an Anytime, All time, Every time photographer [laughs.] I found that working at night I learned much that I could then bring into the day. Working again during the day I discovered elements that I could then take back into the night. Confining myself to one particular area or one particular time period is, I think, self limiting. In general, I look for “timeless” imagery, which could be taken at night, during the day, at dusk, or dawn.


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