Elif Suyabatmaz

“Istanbul”  One of my most favorite cities shot like a graphic designer turned photographer would shoot it, except that she is not one I think :) Have a look at simply a beautiful play of form, light and shadow.

Her About Page SaysElif was born in Baltimore M.D. U.S.A. She moved with her family back to Turkey and lived most of her life in Turkey. After graduating with a BA in Graphic Design, she traveled the world for a year taking photos in numerous countries such as Cuba, Yemen and China. She opened an exhibition of her black and white Cuba photographs at the British Council, Ankara. After finishing her master’s degree she photographed and filmed the urban transformation of Galata. In 2011 she completed a long term first documentary by showing the changes in a building before and after renovation and getting the impressions of the new owners. The documentary was shown in the Boston Turkish Film Festival and was a finalist. Currently she is working on a new documentary about a French building in Vinncene, Paris, France and its 86 year old owner. She is a PhD student in Art-Design and a passionate photographer photographing Istanbul. Elif is a member of a photography group Tiny Collective. (www.tinycollective.com). You can also follow her photography on Instagram as @fisheyedreams.

The Look – Istanbul
Up – Istanbul
Shop Window – Istanbul
Wall Tree – Istanbul

Beth Kirby

Instagram can sometimes come up with some wonderful suggestions for photographers to follow and that’s how I discovered Beth Kirby’s portfolio. Also realised her blog is just as beautiful. Taking the information from her about page which states:

I’m a freelance photographer, stylist, writer, and recipe developer living in the Appalachian foothills of Tennessee. All of my work is inspired by the beauty of imperfection, the South, mysticism, slow living, and metaphor.

My photography.
Shooting both film and digital in natural light, my work aims to capture small moments through prosaic, light driven photos. I’m largely inspired by the notion of finding the familiar in the foreign, by nesting wherever you go as well as conversely finding the exotic in the everyday, of traveling even when you’re at home. From cookery to cabinetry, coast lines to mountain ranges, I try to capture both a sense of intimacy, beauty, and adventure in all things, most especially the mundane. When I’m not behind the stove, lens, or keyboard I can usually be found combing farmers markets & flea markets alike in search of inspiration or cooking for friends in my kitchen or theirs


Nader Khouri

Nader Khouri and the teams he brings together produce authentic editorial and advertising imagery of food and people.  From the beginning of his projects he focuses on having a well planned pre-production process to guide the shoot with a clear vision and goals.  Whether it is putting together a mood board, shot list, or scouting before the shoot Nader and his team do what it takes to produce the compelling imagery clients are looking for.  From having worked as a photojournalist for 10 years and 5 years in the commercial realm Nader now easily switches back and forth from the two.  It was from telling people’s stories that he honed his ability to anticipate moments and combine them with special attention to composition and light.  His work has been honored most recently in Communication Arts and the American Photographic Artist’s SF Something Personal exhibit.  He is a San Francisco Bay Area native and loves discovering all the new restaurants and bars in San Francisco and Oakland.  He makes sure to balance out his urban lifestyle by spending many weekends exploring the rivers and lakes in northern California.  


Dioramas of Iconic Photos: Jojakim Cortis and Adrian Sonderegger,

It all started with a joke—a rather ironic challenge, if you will, to recreate the world’s most expensive photograph: Andreas Gursky’s Rhein II. Because for commercial photographers Jojakim Cortis and Adrian Sonderegger, that meant tolling away in their spare time when money wasn’t coming in to recreate a photograph that had just sold for $4.3 million. This was the beginning of Ikonen, an ambitious project to meticulously recreate iconic historical scenes in miniature. The ongoing project includes immediately recognizable shots—the Wright Brothers taking flight, the Lock Ness Monster poking its head out, “Tank Man” halting tanks during the Tiananmen Square protests—because the images have been seared into our collective memory.

Making of “The Wright Brothers” (by John Thomas Daniels, 1903)

“The Wright Brothers” (by John Thomas Daniels, 1903)

Making of “Tiananmen” (by Stuart Franklin, 1989)

“AS11-40-5878″ (by Edwin Aldrin, 1969)


Yusuke Sakai | LensCulture

Yusuke Sakai | LensCulture

Yusuke Sakai | LensCulture

Yusuke Sakai | LensCulture

Yusuke Sakai | LensCulture.


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