Dioramas of Iconic Photos: Jojakim Cortis and Adrian Sonderegger,

It all started with a joke—a rather ironic challenge, if you will, to recreate the world’s most expensive photograph: Andreas Gursky’s Rhein II. Because for commercial photographers Jojakim Cortis and Adrian Sonderegger, that meant tolling away in their spare time when money wasn’t coming in to recreate a photograph that had just sold for $4.3 million. This was the beginning of Ikonen, an ambitious project to meticulously recreate iconic historical scenes in miniature. The ongoing project includes immediately recognizable shots—the Wright Brothers taking flight, the Lock Ness Monster poking its head out, “Tank Man” halting tanks during the Tiananmen Square protests—because the images have been seared into our collective memory.

Making of “The Wright Brothers” (by John Thomas Daniels, 1903)

“The Wright Brothers” (by John Thomas Daniels, 1903)

Making of “Tiananmen” (by Stuart Franklin, 1989)

“AS11-40-5878″ (by Edwin Aldrin, 1969)


Yusuke Sakai | LensCulture

Yusuke Sakai | LensCulture

Yusuke Sakai | LensCulture

Yusuke Sakai | LensCulture

Yusuke Sakai | LensCulture.


Pentti Sammallahti – Here Far Away | LensCulture

Pentti Sammallahti – Here Far Away | LensCulture.

Here Far Away

Pentti Sammallahti for the first time, we are able to appreciate the breadth and scope of this Finnish photographer’s masterful work  — in a book that spans more than 40 years of exquisite black-and-white photographs. 

 


Munem Wasif | LensCulture

Munem Wasif | LensCulture.

About Munem Wasif

Having grown up in the small town of Comilla, Munem Wasif’s dream kept changing from becoming a pilot to a cricket player and then a photographer. But none of these choices made his father happy. Later in life he moved to the comparably big city Dhaka. He obtained his diploma in photography from Pathshala, a life changing experience, which made him aware of his stories, gave him a photographic voice to photograph stories such as: the dying industry and afflicted workers of jute and tea, excluded people and disrupted lands due to environmental change and salt water, and the city so close to his heart: Old Dhaka.

Wasif prefers to photograph the people he knows. Therefore his country Bangladesh is his first, and favourite field of investigation. He never finds it a problem to be treated as a storyteller of a humanistic tradition, classical in his photographic approach, as long as it shows compassion and the emotional he experiences when photographing his subjects. With an outlook of a traditional style, he goes against the clichés, going from one direction he allows himself to grow in different directions, like the branches on a tree going their separate ways, yet with the same root of humanistic approach.

Since 2008, he has been represented by Agence Vu in Paris. He was one of the curators of Chobimela VII, International Festival of Photography. Currently he is teaching documentary photography in Pathshala, South Asian Media Institute.


Photography Magazine ~ Interesting Links

on photography | Ilovethatphoto.net Photography Magazine.


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