Category Archives: Photomontage + Composites

Chris Kovacs Multiple Exposure B&W Photography

http://www.chriskovacsphotography.com/

(1976) Born in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Chris Kovacs is an award winning photographer best known for his multiple exposure black-and-white photography. Chris is fascinated with science, particularly with quantum mechanics and the possibility of a multiverse, or multiple, parallel universes, which also sets the stage for his style of photographic works. Chris is also interested in exploring dreams, the subconscious mind and memory. Chris’ photography focuses primarily on scenes containing elements of architecture and people. Chris captures “in camera” multiple-exposures of the same scene from different angles and later combines several multiple-exposure photographs together to form a single image. When asked about his photographic style Chris responds “It’s Multiplexualization.” Multiplexualization is a term Chris has coined. It is the digital layering of many different multiple-exposure photographs to form a single image which deliberately depicts a dreamlike quality. Multiplex, in this case, means: many elements in a complex relationship, where ualization represents the single, final image–the deliberate dreamlike visual. All of the images featured on this website were taken with an iPhone 5s. Chris resides in Vancouver, BC, Canada with his wife and two sons.


 

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Time Captured in Layered Landscape Collages by Fong Qi Wei

http://fqwimages.com/time-dimension/

Photography is a medium that is famous for freezing time. The word snapshot suggests that a tiny slice of time is recorded for posterity. But we do know that time is also a dimension, like length, breadth and width. In fact, physicists have a model called space-time: suggesting that time is part of a continuum with the 3 dimensions that we are familiar with. A photographic print is flat, and essentially is made of 2 dimensions: length and width. Yet through composition and lens focus we give a print depth, which is a dimension that is perceived but not physically part of the photographic print. Great photographs (and great paintings) give information in all three dimensions. The best images are the ones which let you feel like you can step directly into the frame into a world which is on the other side. But the print is still an instance. Most paintings and photographs are an instance of time. That’s not the way the world works. We experience a sequence of time, and that’s why a video is somehow more compelling than a freeze frame. I work in the confines of a photographic print, because I like to do so. But in a way, I wanted to break out of this restriction of a single slice of time in photography. Photographic prints are great because they don’t need power to be displayed. They are more or less permanent. Videos are great because they record a sequence of time which shows reality almost like how we experience. Is it possible to combine the two? And not via long exposure photography where often details are lost from motion. So I played around with the tools of digital photography and post processing to give you this series: Time is a dimension.

This series of images are mostly landscapes, seascapes and cityscapes, and they are a single composite made from sequences that span 2-4 hours, mostly of sunrises and sunsets. The basic structure of a landscape is present in every piece. But each panel or concentric layer shows a different slice of time, which is related to the adjacent panel/layer. The transition from daytime to night is gradual and noticeable in every piece, but would not be something you expect to see in a still image. Similarly, our experience of a scene is more than a snapshot. We often remember a sequence of events rather than a still frame full of details. In this series, I strive to capture both details and also a sequence of time in a single 2 dimensional canvas. I hope it gives you pause and reconsider what you experience versus what you shoot with your next camera phone.


Fran Forman ~ Alchemy of Memory

Alchemy of Memory.

Forman_Fran_A-Knight-with-his-Dog_2011-621x600 Forman_Fran_Looking-towards-an-island_2012-600x600 Forman_Fran_Woman-on-a-Journey_2011-664x600

“The camera was the first machine of depiction, and for a time we believed it to tell only the truth. In the end, perhaps all the images we create share a strange mixture of magic, truth, and illusion. And in this soil sprouts metaphor, which is the source of meaning.”          Edward Bateman

Fran Forman on Work & Process:

“In merging photography with painting, portraiture with dreamed landscapes, technologies and generations, my images blur the boundaries between the real and the unreal, re-imagining worlds that, like our own, remain forever a mystery. I invite the viewer to look closely, to engage with me in an imaginative discourse, and to enter into a world of dreams and memory. The visual narratives of my photo collages dissolve the boundaries of time; they connect my fantasies and dreams with the generations that have come before me and attempt to bring them back to life. Perhaps it’s my attempt to stop time.”


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