Béatrice Helg 

Béatrice Helg

Source: Paris Photo 2016 : Béatrice Helg at Photo & Contemporary – The Eye of Photography

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Beth Kirby

Instagram can sometimes come up with some wonderful suggestions for photographers to follow and that’s how I discovered Beth Kirby’s portfolio. Also realised her blog is just as beautiful. Taking the information from her about page which states:

I’m a freelance photographer, stylist, writer, and recipe developer living in the Appalachian foothills of Tennessee. All of my work is inspired by the beauty of imperfection, the South, mysticism, slow living, and metaphor.

My photography.
Shooting both film and digital in natural light, my work aims to capture small moments through prosaic, light driven photos. I’m largely inspired by the notion of finding the familiar in the foreign, by nesting wherever you go as well as conversely finding the exotic in the everyday, of traveling even when you’re at home. From cookery to cabinetry, coast lines to mountain ranges, I try to capture both a sense of intimacy, beauty, and adventure in all things, most especially the mundane. When I’m not behind the stove, lens, or keyboard I can usually be found combing farmers markets & flea markets alike in search of inspiration or cooking for friends in my kitchen or theirs

Bob Avakian

http://bobavakianphotography.com/galleries.html 

I photograph the landscape at night and at dawn. The camera captures the frames as stills, freezing time, regardless of the length of the exposure, and creating an image different from what the eye perceives. I like to believe that these resulting images are from a moment suspended between night and day. The camera is a mirror that allows me to see my surroundings with new eyes while at the same time becoming more aware of myself. Out at night, alone, the day’s cares recede and the sense of time fades. Allowing a heightened awareness to take over, I direct my attention to conveying the quiet and solitude of the night. It is this shift in attention, I believe, that allows me to experience the moment with a different vision. My exposure and printing decisions enable me to take the surroundings I know so well and present them as they have not been seen before. What fascinates me about this process is that magical element of surprise. I venture out in search of scenes that contain an unknown light source of have some other mysterious quality. Of course there are times when I don’t find anything. Since the night sets the stage, I never know where I will wind up. It reminds me so much of life. Bob Avakian

SUSAN DERGES – Paris Photo Agenda

SUSAN DERGES – Paris Photo Agenda.

Susan Derges lives and works on the west coast of England near Dartmoor in Devon. She is one of the pioneers of the largely British movement (along with Adam Fuss, Christopher Bucklow, and Garry Fabian Miler) who in the 1980s and 1990s revived the art of the photogram taking it to new and unexpected places with a freshness of scale, color, and concept. This will be the Danziger Gallery’s third show of Susan Derges’ photographs. Recently, Derges began working in the studio combining analog and digital techniques to create new forms, colors, and perspectives hitherto impossible to capture. Her practice reflects the work of the earliest practitioners of photography but is contemporary in its experimentation and awareness of new technical, conceptual, and environmental issues. Derges’ newest works, which will be receiving their first American showing, largely use the symbols of gates and arches to explore themes of reflection, memory, and the flow of time.

More information at danzigergallery.com

Susan Derges lives and works on the west coast of England near Dartmoor in Devon. She is one of the pioneers of the largely British movement (along with Adam Fuss, Christopher Bucklow, and Garry Fabian Miler) who in the 1980s and 1990s revived the art of the photogram taking it to new and unexpected places with a freshness of scale, color, and concept. This will be the Danziger Gallery’s third show of Susan Derges’ photographs.

Recently, Derges began working in the studio combining analog and digital techniques to create new forms, colors, and perspectives hitherto impossible to capture. Her practice reflects the work of the earliest practitioners of photography but is contemporary in its experimentation and awareness of new technical, conceptual, and environmental issues. Derges’ newest works, which will be receiving their first American showing, largely use the symbols of gates and arches to explore themes of reflection, memory, and the flow of time.
Read more at http://www.parisphoto.com/agenda/susan-derges#DP4qbD7OGxSMTrMX.99

Susan Derges lives and works on the west coast of England near Dartmoor in Devon. She is one of the pioneers of the largely British movement (along with Adam Fuss, Christopher Bucklow, and Garry Fabian Miler) who in the 1980s and 1990s revived the art of the photogram taking it to new and unexpected places with a freshness of scale, color, and concept. This will be the Danziger Gallery’s third show of Susan Derges’ photographs.

Recently, Derges began working in the studio combining analog and digital techniques to create new forms, colors, and perspectives hitherto impossible to capture. Her practice reflects the work of the earliest practitioners of photography but is contemporary in its experimentation and awareness of new technical, conceptual, and environmental issues. Derges’ newest works, which will be receiving their first American showing, largely use the symbols of gates and arches to explore themes of reflection, memory, and the flow of time.
Read more at http://www.parisphoto.com/agenda/susan-derges#DP4qbD7OGxSMTrMX.99