Galleria RAINDROP BLUES

Source: Galleria RAINDROP BLUES

Rome-based Italian photographer Alessio Trerotoli captures the melancholic beauty of rainy days in his fine art photography series, Raindrop Blues. Believing raindrops can be compared to a blues song, as they “fall with a repetitive but fascinating rhythm,” Trerotoli aims to transport his viewers into a dreamlike reality where “rain seems to fall on everyone.”

Made by superimposing glass-printed photographs of rain onto a background images, Trerotol’s rain photos were inspired by Bob Marley’s quote, “Some feel the rain. Others just get wet.” He explains, “I want to create evocative images where every element – the street, the sky, the characters, the viewer – is involved in a romantic and, in at the same time, a melancholic feeling.”

Source: Galleria RAINDROP BLUES

Advertisements

Cig Harvey: You An Orchestra You A Bomb | LENSCRATCH

You an Orchestra You a Bomb, explores my relationship with life itself. It is a body of work about paying attention to and appreciating the fragile present. It captures moments of awe, makes icons of the everyday, and looks at life on the threshold between magic and disaster. I have always experienced the world viscerally but this work shows a heightened awareness of the temporary nature of life. I’m trying to fathom the sacred in the split-seconds of everyday. – Cig Harvey

Source: Cig Harvey: You An Orchestra You A Bomb | LENSCRATCH

Photography’s Bond with Graphic Design

William Klein

…. As the museum writes, the dialogue between photography and graphic design “intensified between 1945 and 1969, and became ever-more experimental.” The result, inspired by the Bauhaus directive to bring together fine art and applied arts, was a generation who “saw creators as social agents furthering a dynamic expression of the contemporary.”

Christine Mathieu

Christine Mathieu

Between sculpting and lighting, Christine Mathieu photographs the symbolics and cultural meanings lodged into ordinary things. She was a prize-winner in the Polaroid-sponsored national competition for schools of photography, and then, held her first photographic exhibition in Paris. She then worked successfully in illustration, graphic design and colored design space. Her artistic work mainly explores the ways of photography only since 2002. Her photographs have been chosen for inclusion in national and international exhibitions and collections.

 

Ralph Gibson: How to Make a Book

http://www.nowness.com/iframe?id=4475311552001

The photography master and Larry Clark cohort explains the magic of the printed page

Source: Ralph Gibson: How to Make a Book | NOWNESS

The photography master and Larry Clark cohort explains the magic of the printed page

“I’ve always wanted to make a film on Ralph because I knew it would be a great excuse to a have private class,” says filmmaker David Luraschi of capturing the master photographer Ralph Gibson at work. “Each time I visit I’m hoping to steal his secrets, but I leave his studio with even more questions.”

“Ralph was nine months late on rent at the Chelsea Hotel before he put out his first book and established himself”

Known for his stark Leica-shot work, How to Make a Book unpicks Gibson’s unique talent for shaping the mise-en-page: the laying out of images within a print publication. Carefully juxtaposing unexpected images across double-page spreads, the resultant diptychs create something independent of their separate parts. Gibson began his career in the 1960s assisting influential photojournalist Dorothea Lange and documentarian Robert Frank, and published his first work, Somnambulist, in 1970, a release which launched his print-making career soon after securing Larry Clark’s seminal book, Tulsa.

“Each time I visit Ralph I’m hoping to steal his secrets, but I leave his studio with even more questions”

Luraschi worked in collaboration with Danilo Parra – the Chilean-American director, recognized for his music videos for A$AP Rocky and the Black Lips – and came to know Gibson and his work through his father. “There’s a picture that my dad took of Ralph sleeping in San Francisco in 1961 where you can tell there’s no sheets,” says Luraschi, known for his popular Instagram series of street snaps taken where all of the subjects are captured from behind. “Two of his Leicas were in the pawn shop, and he was nine months late on rent at the Chelsea Hotel before he put out his first book and established himself.”

Chris Kovacs Multiple Exposure B&W Photography

http://www.chriskovacsphotography.com/ (1976) Born in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Chris Kovacs is an award winning photographer best known for his multiple exposure black-and-white photography. Chris is fascinated with science, particularly with quantum mechanics and the possibility of a multiverse, or multiple, parallel universes, which also sets the stage for his style of photographic works. Chris is also […]