Category Archives: Hi-Tech Studio

Portrait Photographers’ Favorite Camera Lenses

Portrait Photographers’ Favorite Camera Lenses

By Theano Nikitas

When it comes to developing a personal style in their portraits, many photographers stray from the medium telephoto lenses that have traditionally been the staple of portraiture. Because photographers today are diversifying their clientele and workload—shooting an editorial portrait one day, a fashion show the following week and a commissioned portrait on the weekend—it’s often difficult to nail down the “best” portrait lenses. We spoke with several photographers and asked them to name their favorite lenses for shooting portraits, and when and why they prefer one piece of glass over another. We’ve alphabetically organized the lenses by brand name so you can quickly see what’s hot for your camera.

– See more at: http://www.pdnonline.com/gear/Portrait-Photographe-9272.shtml#sthash.r661s3mQ.dpuf

 

By Theano Nikitas

When it comes to developing a personal style in their portraits, many photographers stray from the medium telephoto lenses that have traditionally been the staple of portraiture. Because photographers today are diversifying their clientele and workload—shooting an editorial portrait one day, a fashion show the following week and a commissioned portrait on the weekend—it’s often difficult to nail down the “best” portrait lenses. We spoke with several photographers and asked them to name their favorite lenses for shooting portraits, and when and why they prefer one piece of glass over another. We’ve alphabetically organized the lenses by brand name so you can quickly see what’s hot for your camera.

– See more at: http://www.pdnonline.com/gear/Portrait-Photographe-9272.shtml#sthash.r661s3mQ.dpuf

Portrait Photographers’ Favorite Camera Lenses

OCTOBER 14, 2013

By Theano Nikitas

When it comes to developing a personal style in their portraits, many photographers stray from the medium telephoto lenses that have traditionally been the staple of portraiture. Because photographers today are diversifying their clientele and workload—shooting an editorial portrait one day, a fashion show the following week and a commissioned portrait on the weekend—it’s often difficult to nail down the “best” portrait lenses. We spoke with several photographers and asked them to name their favorite lenses for shooting portraits, and when and why they prefer one piece of glass over another. We’ve alphabetically organized the lenses by brand name so you can quickly see what’s hot for your camera.

– See more at: http://www.pdnonline.com/gear/Portrait-Photographe-9272.shtml#sthash.r661s3mQ.dpuf

Portrait Photographers’ Favorite Camera Lenses

OCTOBER 14, 2013

By Theano Nikitas

When it comes to developing a personal style in their portraits, many photographers stray from the medium telephoto lenses that have traditionally been the staple of portraiture. Because photographers today are diversifying their clientele and workload—shooting an editorial portrait one day, a fashion show the following week and a commissioned portrait on the weekend—it’s often difficult to nail down the “best” portrait lenses. We spoke with several photographers and asked them to name their favorite lenses for shooting portraits, and when and why they prefer one piece of glass over another. We’ve alphabetically organized the lenses by brand name so you can quickly see what’s hot for your camera.

– See more at: http://www.pdnonline.com/gear/Portrait-Photographe-9272.shtml#sthash.r661s3mQ.dpuf


The Best Software for Managing Your Studio & Photography Business

 

The Best Software for Managing Your Studio & Photography Business.

OCTOBER 09, 2012

By Henry Anderson

The dream of becoming a professional photographer is one filled with ideas of exciting clients, creative freedom and endless artistic possibilities. Rarely does that dream include laborious paperwork tasks, diligent contract negotiations with a client, tax filings or invoicing, yet that’s what a lot of photographers end up spending a majority of their time doing.

Just a few years ago studio photographers had to shell out hundreds or thousands of dollars for database developers who would create custom (or at least semi-custom) solutions to track their businesses operating tasks. Programs like FileMaker or Microsoft Access were used to track clients and jobs, despite the sometimes clumsy or tedious steps needed just to generate an invoice or follow up on an e-mail. If a studio’s database developer went out of business, they were often stuck without the ability to make changes to documents or fix the inevitable bugs that crop up.

Luckily the Internet has allowed specialized tools to be developed in markets that were otherwise too small for large software companies to focus their attention on, and a host of custom solutions are now offered with affordable (and scalable) pricing and support that’s always available. And with the data being generated by online apps living in the cloud, there’s less fear that a lost or stolen computer will mean the end of a studio’s ability to conduct business.

The following is a breakdown of our favorite studio-management tools available to photographers today ….


Horacio Salinas

Horacio Salinas

Horacio Salinas is a conceptual, still life photographer in New York


Nuno Correia Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“My Leaf Aptus-II 7 lets me shoot all day long with no problems. The combination of its robustness and the image quality produced by its 33MP sensor makes this camera back ideal for commercial work.” Nuno Correia …….. happy to introduce Nuno Correia from Portugal. Nuno specializes in Food and Still-Life.
Nuno uses Leaf Aptus-II 7 for creative commercial images.

See Nuno’s work on the Leaf Gallery

http://www.nunocorreiaphotography.com/


Color Printing Technique

Color Printing Technique – Digital Photo Pro | DigitalPhotoPro.com


After your image is sized and sharpened, it’s ready for you to make a print. To this point, you’ve been working with a backlit display with vivid RGB colors that exceed the saturation and brightness of anything you can put on paper. Now the moment of truth arrives, and you need to translate what you see on the monitor to a print that can convey the same feeling. The problem is much the same as it was when photographers shot transparency film: There’s still a huge discrepancy between the dynamic range and color gamut that can be represented with a glowing backlit monitor image and what can be printed on paper, where the brightest thing is the white paper. Another major issue is the way images are constructed in the two different media. RGB images on the monitor exist in an additive color space: Red, green and blue light is added together to make white. CMYK images, which form the bulk of paper-based output, use cyan, magenta, yellow and black to subtract from paper white to make a color image ….

 


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