Untangling Instagram’s Growing Web of Influence

Five Years on: Untangling Instagram’s Growing Web of Influence 

By Tom Jenkins, for CNN … Instagram’s fifth birthday party had a guest list stretching to 400 million. That’s how many monthly active users the photo-sharing app now has and almost half of them are under 25. In the triumvirate of social media (along with Facebook and Twitter), it’s definitely the cool one.

Much of the platform’s appeal lies in it simplicity, hence developers have changed very little since its inception. But with the introduction of sponsored posts it feel like Instagram is at something of a crossroads. Will it lose its idiosyncratic creative spirit or simply push on to the next level with a whole host of new features?

Only time will tell, but let’s get serious for a minute and forget the filtering fun and unobtainable constructed reality, and examine how Instagram really is changing the world.

Travel

Instagram is broadening our horizons as we seek ever more photogenic locations, while travel brands are commissioning popular Instagram photographers as part of their marketing approach.

Eelco Roos, who has shot for Travel Alberta, as well as brands such as Samsung and Ducati, quit his job as an IT Consultant for IBM and is now one of the most popular photographers on Instagram. “For travel brands, Instagram is more measurable than traditional media in terms of finding out what an audience thinks. I haven’t experienced hostility from ‘traditional’ photographers, but I do have to defend ways of photography other than the traditional ones sometimes.”

Instagram is also opening Western eyes to more inaccessible places, Iran for example, where Facebook and Twitter are banned, and accounts such as @everydayafricaare challenging preconceptions. Taylor Pemberton, a designer and creative director, left his home in New York earlier this year to pursue a nomadic lifestyle as a photographer. He eventually found himself in North Korea: “I had this hope that even though the tourism experience is sanctioned, my camera could see past the façade and bring forth the everyday nuances that exist in human life. I think a platform like Instagram is giving people a glimpse into other worlds, cultures, and topics. Like other forms of media, some Instagram accounts create more education than controversy, more conviction than humour.”

Food

It’s also making us more adventurous with what we eat.

Without Instagram, there would be no food porn. As with fashion, this is where trends become reality and food writers such as Hemsley and Hemsley, whose super healthy dishes, with their rich and often bold colour palettes, seem almost tailor-made for the format, enjoy huge followings.

However, eating out (and in) has become such a documentable event that many people spend more time trying to get the perfect shot than enjoying the food. “Sometimes I wonder if guests are present at the table when they are obsessing about photographing everything they eat,” says Massimo Bottura, chef patron of Osteria Francescana, voted second best restaurant in the world. “One time a guest suggested I change the colour of the plates (from white to black) because he said the photographs would look better.”

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Portrait Photographers’ Favorite Camera Lenses

Portrait Photographers’ Favorite Camera Lenses

By Theano Nikitas

When it comes to developing a personal style in their portraits, many photographers stray from the medium telephoto lenses that have traditionally been the staple of portraiture. Because photographers today are diversifying their clientele and workload—shooting an editorial portrait one day, a fashion show the following week and a commissioned portrait on the weekend—it’s often difficult to nail down the “best” portrait lenses. We spoke with several photographers and asked them to name their favorite lenses for shooting portraits, and when and why they prefer one piece of glass over another. We’ve alphabetically organized the lenses by brand name so you can quickly see what’s hot for your camera.

– See more at: http://www.pdnonline.com/gear/Portrait-Photographe-9272.shtml#sthash.r661s3mQ.dpuf

 

By Theano Nikitas

When it comes to developing a personal style in their portraits, many photographers stray from the medium telephoto lenses that have traditionally been the staple of portraiture. Because photographers today are diversifying their clientele and workload—shooting an editorial portrait one day, a fashion show the following week and a commissioned portrait on the weekend—it’s often difficult to nail down the “best” portrait lenses. We spoke with several photographers and asked them to name their favorite lenses for shooting portraits, and when and why they prefer one piece of glass over another. We’ve alphabetically organized the lenses by brand name so you can quickly see what’s hot for your camera.

– See more at: http://www.pdnonline.com/gear/Portrait-Photographe-9272.shtml#sthash.r661s3mQ.dpuf

Portrait Photographers’ Favorite Camera Lenses

OCTOBER 14, 2013

By Theano Nikitas

When it comes to developing a personal style in their portraits, many photographers stray from the medium telephoto lenses that have traditionally been the staple of portraiture. Because photographers today are diversifying their clientele and workload—shooting an editorial portrait one day, a fashion show the following week and a commissioned portrait on the weekend—it’s often difficult to nail down the “best” portrait lenses. We spoke with several photographers and asked them to name their favorite lenses for shooting portraits, and when and why they prefer one piece of glass over another. We’ve alphabetically organized the lenses by brand name so you can quickly see what’s hot for your camera.

– See more at: http://www.pdnonline.com/gear/Portrait-Photographe-9272.shtml#sthash.r661s3mQ.dpuf

Portrait Photographers’ Favorite Camera Lenses

OCTOBER 14, 2013

By Theano Nikitas

When it comes to developing a personal style in their portraits, many photographers stray from the medium telephoto lenses that have traditionally been the staple of portraiture. Because photographers today are diversifying their clientele and workload—shooting an editorial portrait one day, a fashion show the following week and a commissioned portrait on the weekend—it’s often difficult to nail down the “best” portrait lenses. We spoke with several photographers and asked them to name their favorite lenses for shooting portraits, and when and why they prefer one piece of glass over another. We’ve alphabetically organized the lenses by brand name so you can quickly see what’s hot for your camera.

– See more at: http://www.pdnonline.com/gear/Portrait-Photographe-9272.shtml#sthash.r661s3mQ.dpuf

2010 in review

The stats helper monkeys at WordPress.com mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and here’s a high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads This blog is doing awesome!.

Crunchy numbers

Featured image

A Boeing 747-400 passenger jet can hold 416 passengers. This blog was viewed about 1,500 times in 2010. That’s about 4 full 747s.

In 2010, there were 118 new posts, not bad for the first year! There were 211 pictures uploaded, taking up a total of 28mb. That’s about 4 pictures per week.

The busiest day of the year was August 8th with 60 views. The most popular post that day was Jay Maisel Photography.

Where did they come from?

The top referring sites in 2010 were en.wordpress.com, android-vs-ipad.co.cc, en.search.wordpress.com, bwvision.com, and obama-scandal-exposed.co.cc.

Some visitors came searching, mostly for garret suhrie, duncan loughrey, water howard schatz, carlos tarrats still life, and mitch dobrowner.

Attractions in 2010

These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.

Jay Maisel Photography August 2010

Garret Suhrie August 2010

Chema Madoz Fotógrafo August 2010

The Ultimate Guide For Long Exposures February 2010

Issuu – Personal Bookmarked Collections July 2010

August Bradley

August Bradley

August Bradley’s conceptual approach to fashion and commercial imagery is heavy on mystery, allegory and visual narratives that have their roots in classic literature as much as they do fine art—not an easy sell for a photographer working in the gentrified world of advertising. Yet Bradley, a relative newcomer to the photography industry, is highly sought after for his singular vision in an environment where established photographers are working against a tough economy and the upheaval of existing business structures.

Densely complex in theme even if minimal in composition, Bradley’s dramatic photography is hyperstylized in technique and often centered on a “style” component, he says, “though it’s not really about the clothes.” He has many clients that come to him specifically for commercial or fashion photography, but Bradley notes that the stylization is less his brand of fashion photography and more to complement each story and to give the imagery more of a “detachment from our day-to-day perspective.” Props and surreal backgrounds play a big part in selling the riddles in his images, and he prefers to have an element of literary fiction, noting that as an avid reader he has found the best literary fiction to reveal more fundamental truths than the objective world of nonfiction ever could.