Cig Harvey: You An Orchestra You A Bomb | LENSCRATCH

You an Orchestra You a Bomb, explores my relationship with life itself. It is a body of work about paying attention to and appreciating the fragile present. It captures moments of awe, makes icons of the everyday, and looks at life on the threshold between magic and disaster. I have always experienced the world viscerally but this work shows a heightened awareness of the temporary nature of life. I’m trying to fathom the sacred in the split-seconds of everyday. – Cig Harvey

Source: Cig Harvey: You An Orchestra You A Bomb | LENSCRATCH

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Ralph Gibson: How to Make a Book

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The photography master and Larry Clark cohort explains the magic of the printed page

Source: Ralph Gibson: How to Make a Book | NOWNESS

The photography master and Larry Clark cohort explains the magic of the printed page

“I’ve always wanted to make a film on Ralph because I knew it would be a great excuse to a have private class,” says filmmaker David Luraschi of capturing the master photographer Ralph Gibson at work. “Each time I visit I’m hoping to steal his secrets, but I leave his studio with even more questions.”

“Ralph was nine months late on rent at the Chelsea Hotel before he put out his first book and established himself”

Known for his stark Leica-shot work, How to Make a Book unpicks Gibson’s unique talent for shaping the mise-en-page: the laying out of images within a print publication. Carefully juxtaposing unexpected images across double-page spreads, the resultant diptychs create something independent of their separate parts. Gibson began his career in the 1960s assisting influential photojournalist Dorothea Lange and documentarian Robert Frank, and published his first work, Somnambulist, in 1970, a release which launched his print-making career soon after securing Larry Clark’s seminal book, Tulsa.

“Each time I visit Ralph I’m hoping to steal his secrets, but I leave his studio with even more questions”

Luraschi worked in collaboration with Danilo Parra – the Chilean-American director, recognized for his music videos for A$AP Rocky and the Black Lips – and came to know Gibson and his work through his father. “There’s a picture that my dad took of Ralph sleeping in San Francisco in 1961 where you can tell there’s no sheets,” says Luraschi, known for his popular Instagram series of street snaps taken where all of the subjects are captured from behind. “Two of his Leicas were in the pawn shop, and he was nine months late on rent at the Chelsea Hotel before he put out his first book and established himself.”

Daniel Shipp Photography

I’m interested in creating images with a narrative that you can feel. Building emotion into my images makes the process very intuitive and extremely slow. The formal qualities of my work reflect the conceptual indulgence provided by art school, the polish I learnt assisting fashion photographers and the many hours I spend making pictures alone in the studio. In past years I have collaborated on projects with Future Classic Music, Rosemount Australian Fashion Week and Oxfam/Cirque de Soleil. Daniel Shipp

Botanical Inquiry from Daniel Shipp on Vimeo.

How to Improve Your Fine Art Photography

via How to Improve Your Fine Art Photography – PictureCorrect.

How do you proceed to grow and develop as a fine art photographer? Basically, regular use of your camera with deliberate intent, while paying attention to the following, is what brings it about.

fine art photography

“THE THINKER!” captured by Irene Drawman

1. PURSUE THE GOAL

To make images that stir the viewer’s thinking and emotions.

2. DEVELOP YOUR “SEEING” SKILLS

It’s the first and most important skill that you need to learn.

Seeing Exercises. Set aside 45 minutes from time to time around your home, with your camera and a subject that has your sustained interest. Relax for a few minutes then start taking pictures. Study part of your subject for a moment or two, then re-focus on another part of your subject and study it for a while. Become aware of colors and shapes. See how many details you can find. Then note the following:

  • Personal responses: Tune in to your feelings/thoughts as you locate the subject matter.
  • Impression: Look at your chosen subject matter, or any part of it, and see it simply as a geometric shape or an arrangement of geometric shapes. Note the position where things look most graphically appealing.
  • Expression: What does the subject matter seem to express in the way of sensation? Rough/smooth? Hot/cold? Sharp/dull? Hard/soft? Moving/still? What about emotion and mood? Love/hate? Joy/sadness? Anger/delight? Peace/turmoil? Tranquility/disturbance? Respond with your perceptions of sensation and emotion.
  • Meaning: What ideas does the subject matter seem to suggest? Respond with your intellect.
  • Subject Theme: In view of your personal responses, the graphic impression, what is expressed and seems to be said, decide upon a subject theme, the main idea/feeling you wish to convey to the picture viewer…………….. follow the link to read further

Dioramas of Iconic Photos: Jojakim Cortis and Adrian Sonderegger,

It all started with a joke—a rather ironic challenge, if you will, to recreate the world’s most expensive photograph: Andreas Gursky’s Rhein II. Because for commercial photographers Jojakim Cortis and Adrian Sonderegger, that meant tolling away in their spare time when money wasn’t coming in to recreate a photograph that had just sold for $4.3 million. This was the beginning of Ikonen, an ambitious project to meticulously recreate iconic historical scenes in miniature. The ongoing project includes immediately recognizable shots—the Wright Brothers taking flight, the Lock Ness Monster poking its head out, “Tank Man” halting tanks during the Tiananmen Square protests—because the images have been seared into our collective memory.

Making of “The Wright Brothers” (by John Thomas Daniels, 1903)
“The Wright Brothers” (by John Thomas Daniels, 1903)
Making of “Tiananmen” (by Stuart Franklin, 1989)
“AS11-40-5878″ (by Edwin Aldrin, 1969)