Instagram

 

What matters now is Instagram. It’s intoxicating. I’ve recently become hooked. It’s nectar for visual people, like having a poem in your pocket. Just the act of looking for Instagrammable pictures has opened my eyes more widely. I see all kinds of things I didn’t see before: from the big landscape to the tiny, intimate moment, it encourages a closer engagement with the world tiny visual meditations throughout the day. It’s the perfect medium for ridiculously busy people who feel the urge to create and communicate, but need to do it on the run. For visualizes, it is also the perfect way to check in on friends and keep up on them—no need to write the umpteenth email of the day!

It also raises the bar on what makes a good photograph, because there are so many good photographs on Instagram. It’s a reminder that photography is a weirdly democratic medium and that a photographer has to be incredibly disciplined about his craft. On the flipside, Instagram is so friendly and forgiving that anyone can post images without having to worry about whether they are great. This kind of loosening of restraints is surely good for the creative process, as can be seen in all those good Instagram photographs.

—Kathy Ryan, director of photography at the New York Times Magazine.

2013-06-12 18.07.58 2013-06-12 18.08.40 2013-06-12 18.10.25 2013-06-12 18.11.09 2013-06-12 18.11.24 2013-06-12 18.33.02

Advertisements

About Farah Mahbub

Farah Mahbub was born and brought up in Karachi. She attained her bachelor’s degree in fine art, literature and psychology. Being primarily self-taught, she has been working as a professional photographer since 1988. Her photographic journey has taken its course through exploration of various genres, ranging from fine art, commercial, architectural and landscape photography. However for her, personal self-expression is best conveyed through fine art photography, which she continues to explore and dedicate her abilities to. Working formerly in analogue, her present work now is primarily in the digital format. As a practicing artist, Farah’s work has been exhibited in both local and international exhibitions including the 11th Asian Art Biennale in Bangladesh and the Mohatta Palace Museum in Pakistan. Her work has also been published in multiple books most notably Journeys of the Spirit: Pakistan Art in the New Millenium. Farah joined the Indus Valley School of Art and Architecture in 1997 as a faculty member, where she has been ever since. Under her tenure, photography has evolved from a single class into an undergraduate minor spanning the Communication Design and Fine Art and Interior Design departments. Farah recently had her fifth solo show "Baraka Silsila-e-Nisbat" with an accompanying monograph. View all posts by Farah Mahbub

You must be logged in to post a comment.

%d bloggers like this: